Sandra Bloodworth
Sandra Bloodworth
Clara Zetkin’s socialism
Sandra Bloodworth

In 1901, the Manchester Guardian reported on the German Social Democratic Party’s (SPD) conference: “Three women especially stand out as really remarkable speakers ... What these ladies do not know in the realm of social politics is not worth knowing. And they support their views not only with cogency and logic, but, when necessary, with a very Niagara of shrill invective.” In spite of the “shrill invective”, the writer admitted: “Whenever one of these female ‘comrades’ occupies the tribune the whole congress pulses with animation”. Clara Zetkin was one of those comrades.

Freedom is a class question
Sandra Bloodworth

Scott Morrison smirked as he announced that he was removing the “heavy hand of government” while COVID cases soared in late December. Government would no longer be “shutting down people’s lives”. The repellent image was a metaphor for this inhuman society.

Celebrating the Paris Commune of 1871
Celebrating the Paris Commune
Sandra Bloodworth

The workers of Paris, amidst the failures and treasons of the ruling classes, have understood that the hour has struck for them to save the situation by taking into their own hands the direction of public affairs ... They have understood that it is their imperious duty, and their absolute right, to render themselves masters of their own destinies, by seizing upon the governmental power.”

What Karl Marx learned from the Paris Commune
Marx and the Commune
Sandra Bloodworth

Well before the Paris Commune, in the German Ideology and “Theses on Feuerbach”, both written in the mid-1840s, Karl Marx and his collaborator Frederick Engels argued that it was only through struggle that the mass of workers and oppressed could come to see their own power, throw off the ideas of capitalism and become capable of founding a new society.

The fight for civil liberties in Australia has a long history
Sandra Bloodworth

The right to free speech and assembly is again under attack. But fighting for the right to protest has often been one of the most important tasks for Australian socialists. This article is edited from a talk given to activists in New South Wales involved in the new campaign to defend democratic right in the state.

Marx’s Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte
Sandra Bloodworth

Karl Marx’s pamphlet The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte, written in 1852, is a masterpiece of journalism with an enduring relevance that might surprise those who think Marx is old hat or simply haven’t read his writings. He begins with the insurrectionary uprising in Paris in February 1848, an uprising which, as Marx’s collaborator Frederick Engels wrote in 1895, “found its echo in the victorious insurrections in Vienna, Milan and Berlin ... all Europe was drawn into the movement, all the way to the Russian border”.

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