Ashley Fataar
South African government response to COVID-19 crisis: profits matter more than workers’ lives
Ashley Fataar

The South African working class is being ravaged. Government figures record thousands of infections and hundreds of deaths per day from COVID-19. In late March, President Cyril Ramaphosa announced a national lockdown to contain the virus. But as restrictions were eased on 1 May and again on 1 June, the case numbers began to soar. At almost 600,000 cases, the country now has the fifth-highest number of recorded infections in the world.

South African students resume their fight and face repression
Ashley Fataar

Students at universities across South Africa have been demonstrating for the complete removal of university fees for poor students. They are pushing for the realisation of the demands raised by the #FeesMustFall campaign last year, which was the largest wave of protests since the fall of apartheid and drew tens of thousands of students into the streets. In this fresh round of protests, students are taking action at universities across six provinces.

Fee protests point to a much deeper problem at South African universities
Fee protests point to a much deeper problem at South African universities
Ashley Fataar

Many students who enter South African universities are underprepared by poor schools in working class townships and rural areas. They struggle to deal with the coursework and have to work part time to make ends meet.

The fight for the soul of South Africa’s labour movement
The fight for the soul of South Africa’s labour movement
Ashley Fataar

The Congress of South African Trade Unions (COSATU), the country’s largest trade union federation, expelled the metalworkers’ union, NUMSA, on 8 November. NUMSA was the federation’s largest and most politically militant affiliate.

South African mineworkers on strike for 5 months
Ashley Fataar

Seventy-five thousand platinum mine workers have entered their 21st week of strike action – the longest in South Africa since 1994. They are demanding a wage of US$1,250 per month. The mine bosses are offering $750.

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