Vashti Fox

Vashti Fox is the author of The Story of Palestine: Empire, Repression and Resistance, available to purchase from Red Flag Books.

Perth’s 1980s ‘fascist revolution’
Vashti Fox

Between 1984 and 1989, tens of thousands of lampposts, letterboxes and bus stops across Perth were covered with neo-Nazi posters bearing slogans such as “No Asians”, “No coloureds”, “White revolution: The only solution” and “Jews are ruining your life”. The poster campaign, initiated and organised by the Australian Nationalist Movement (ANM), was the opening salvo in a campaign of terror that ANM leader Jack Van Tongeren believed would make the city the centre of a fascist revolution.

WA media COVID
Vashti Fox

Across Australia, more than 650 people have died with COVID in the last two weeks. Not one of those deaths occurred in Western Australia. Nearly 5,000 people are currently hospitalised. In Western Australia, the number is zero. The country is averaging around 70,000 new cases per day. In the west, we’ve thus far been lucky to keep it to around a dozen per day.

We need a united movement against the far right
We need a united movement
Vashti Fox

Before the pandemic, it would have been hard to predict that mass far-right mobilisations would dominate the streets of Australia’s capital cities. But they have, and they threaten to continue.

Putting the anti-vax rallies in historical perspective
anti-vax rallies in perspective
Vashti Fox

The ongoing anti-vax, anti-lockdown movement across the country is one of the most sustained and militant series of street marches of the far right in decades. In different states, the demonstrations have different political targets, but they have been largest in Labor-governed jurisdictions.

It’s time to confront the anti-vax
Vashti Fox

When fascists attacked the headquarters of an Italian trade union confederation this month, tens of thousands of anti-fascists responded by taking to the streets. We should take note in Australia.

Australia and the Spanish Civil War
Vashti Fox

On 22 March 1937, 1,000 people turned out to Melbourne University’s Public Lecture Theatre to debate the motion: “The Spanish government is the ruin of Spain”. It was a hot night and, according to a newspaper report, communists, Catholics, republicans and other students were “packed into the steeply raked rows of the public lecture theatre, cramming the aisles and the space in front of the platform; they were jammed in at the doors and corridors, they climbed into skylights and ventilators”.

Load More